NeemFirst Blog


halitosis cause, I: bacteria in the mouth, set f

…and now, back to our regularly scheduled programming…info on Halitosis 
Sugar – Bacteria – Halitosis 
There is an undeniable link between sugar and bacteria, and thus between sugar and halitosis. But if this halitosis connection isn’t enough motivation to stop consuming sugar, know that sugar also throws off your entire processes and hormone production, mutiliates your immune system, and causes weight gain, in addition to feeding bacteria and yeast. And I mean all sugar is considered bad when you’re in a halitosis predicament: bread, white rice, wheat, flour, fruits, and alcohol (except tequila). Most carbs all turn into sugar, which keeps halitosis sticking around. The same can be said of the relationship between candidiasis (yeast) and sugar. Do a search on my blog for sugar substitutes to maintain good health and keep halitosis at bay. They’re good for you, AND good tasting. Xylitol has the double bonus of killing bacteria, so it’s an excellent choice for battling halitosis. My favorite is Agave syrup. Both are obviously excellent sugar substitutes for diabetics, too.

Tomorrow: Acidic Body is Prone to Disease, and Halitosis 
Renée

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halitosis cause, I: bacteria in the mouth, set d

OK. I dropped off the face of the Earth for 2 weeks. Deadlines in Real Life interferred with the fantasy. But I’m back now. On with the Neem Adventure. For now, the continuation of Help for halitosis. I WILL be back tomorrow!  : ]

Environment of Halitosis 
There must be a reason why one mouth is prolific with halitosis bacteria, and why another mouth is not. The presence of halitosis and sulfurous odor-causing bacteria is a matter of environment. Things to consider when battling halitosis and the bacteria that causes halitosis: diet, sugar intake, exercise, vitamin deficiencies, yeast / candida albicans, PH, toxic-load, medications, and the presence of heavy metals. Some experts even suggest blood-type as being a determining factor in who contracts halitosis. But since that’s not something we can affect, let’s deal with what we can.

Halitosis and Vitamins
If you have halitosis, make sure that you’re taking a vitamin supplement; although it would be much better to get the majority of your vitamins through food sources. Vitamins found effective in battling halitosis include Zinc, CoQ10, folic acid. Zinc is especially critical, because it’s been shown to have a direct dampening effect on the sulfurous bacteria found in halitosis (it’s also recommended for acne problems). You’ll frequently find Zinc in toothpaste and mouthwash, for this exact effect on the bacteria causing halitosis. Selenium, Vitamin C and Vitamin E have also recommended to improve halitosis.

Tomorrow: Halitosis and the Diet
Renée



halitosis and foods, pt.II

Foods can help you get rid of halitosis. Please read the entry “Halitosis and foods, pt. I” for the first portion of this post.

Teas for Better Breath & Digestion
For teas, drink peppermint tea, fennel tea, and ginger tea. Each will improve your digestive system as well as halitosis. And since some experts are of the opinion that halitosis is caused by issues in the digestive system, you should do whatever you can to improve it. I’m of the same opinion, which is why I recommend getting rid of the excess yeast in the body and digestive tract.
Foods to Run From
Other foods to stay away from include pastrami, salami, and pepperoni due to the spices (essential oils) used; Camembert, Roquefort, and blue cheese; fermented dairy; sugar; alcohol; most mints and alcohol mouthwashes; some fish like anchovies and tuna; coffee.
Some Alternatives to Keep your Breath Sweet
An alternative to mints (which can also dry out your breath and worsen halitosis) is to use peppermint oil. One drop on the tongue is all you need.
Instead of sugar (which feeds yeast and bacteria), check out xylitol, which is a natural powder, very sweet, good taste, AND kills bacteria!! You’ll have halitosis on the run. It’s popularity in dental products is increasing, too.
Or, you could use Agave syrup, which is my favorite for taste. It is, like sugar, tasteless – except for it’s sweet flavor. No aftertaste. And no, I’m not lying – No aftertaste. Xylitol scores approx 7 on the sugar index, and Agave syrup around 10. Sugar scores 100. Obviously, it’s great for diabetics, too.
ps. another tip for reducing bacteria in the mouth and getting rid of halitosis? If you don’t have neem toothpaste, then put a drop of neem oil on top of your toothpaste. It’s very strong tasting, but get used to it. It’s your friend in combating halitosis.  But, like most toothpastes, it’s not recommended that you swallow or consume neem oil.
Renée